Commercial & Residential Real Estate Law

Florek & Counsel's team of knowledgeable attorneys have earned a reputation for excellence within the commercial and residential real estate community. Our experienced counselors offer trusted and respected legal representation throughout the many  individualized concentrations of this multi-faceted practice area. 

Unparalleled Representation

Our team of real estate attorneys have dedicated themselves to mastering the intricacies and complex nuances of this specialized discipline of law.

The well-respected real estate attorneys at Florek & Counsel, LLC offer decades of experience handling the challenging legal issues involved in commercial and residential real estate transactions and litigation.

Our services in commercial and residential real estate include:

  • Contracts of Sale (Review, Drafting and Litigating)
  • Title Reports, Building Department Records, Building Plans and Unpaid Taxes, Lien and Judgment Searches (Review and Retrieval)
  • Commercial and Residential Closings
  • Foreclosure Proceedings, Mitigation and Defense
  • Landlord Tenant Lease Agreements and Dispute Resolution
  • Subordination and Non-Disturbance Agreements
  • Real Estate Refinancing
  • Mortgage Assignments
  • Equity Stripping Plans
  • Commercial and Institutional Lender Representation
  • Deed Transfers
  • Deeds in lieu & Short Sales
  • Debt Resolution & Loan Modifications

 

While the articles and information on these pages aim to provide an accurate, objective and up-to-date portrayal and review of the facts concerning various disciplines within today's legal profession, the information contained within these articles is intended for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. No reader should act on the basis of the content without seeking appropriate legal counsel.* 


THE IMPORTANCE OF AN SNDA AGREEMENT

By: Natia Daviti, Esq.

A subordination, non-disturbance and attornment (“SNDA”) agreement is essentially a combination of three contracts into one agreement. The “subordination” part allows a lender-mortgagee of the property whose lien is junior (or subordinate) to the tenant's lien to become superior to the lien of the lease (this generally occurs when the lease of the property is recorded before the lien of the mortgage is).

In the event of a foreclosure, if a lender's lien is the superior one, the lender may eliminate all junior liens attached to the premises. Overwhelmingly, lenders and banks will insist that their loans be the primary lien on the property, and this makes sense as most landlords understand that their premises will be more valuable and attractive to financiers and lenders... Read the rest of the article here